Innovation, People / Stories, Social Entrepreneurship

Natural agriculture

Natural agriculture: The man behind ‘zero-budget spiritual farming’

 

Padma awardee believes there’s much to learn from ancient Indian cultivation techniques

Jiwamrita, Subhash Palekar, zero budget farming, zero budget spiritual farming, Subhash Palekar jiwamrita, indian agricultural techniques, india news, latest news, maharashtra news

Subhash Palekar demonstrates the preparation of ‘Jiwamrita’ formulation.

 

…..“The farmer needs to apply to the crop a dose of Jiwamrita — a fermented solution containing 200 litres water, 5-10 litres cow urine, 10 kg dung, 1 kg each of gur (jaggery) and besan (gram flour), and a handful of soil from the farm bund — for every acre. The other important thing is to spread a carpet of harvested crop residue between crop rows, which helps to absorb moisture from the atmosphere and also prevents emergence of weeds,” explains Palekar.
According to him, Jiwamrita basically nurtures thousands of bacteria essential for healthy crop growth. The urine and dung used in the formulation, he insists, should be from indigenous cattle: “one desi cow can nourish 30 acres”……

 

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Courtesy : K F Keravala

 

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Business Ideas, Innovation, News, People / Stories, Technology

Shiva Ayyadurai an Indian-American scientist invented Email when he was just 14.

The 14 Year Old Indian Boy Who Invented Email turned 52 on Dec 2nd 2015. But how many of us know that, Shiva Ayyadurai an Indian-American scientist invented Email when he was just 14.

Ayyadurai was born to a Tamil Family in Bombay. At the age of seven, he left with his family to live in the US. In 1978, aged 14, he developed a full-scale emulation of the interoffice mail system which he called “E-mail”. It replicated all the functions of the interoffice mail system: Inbox, Outbox, Folders, Memo, Attachments, Address Book, etc. These features are now familiar parts of every email system.

Studying at Livingston High School in New Jersey, Ayyadurai began his work on the email system for the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey. He closely observed that the desktop of each secretary, in addition to the typewriter, had an Inbox, Outbox, Drafts, Carbon Copy Paper, Folders, Address Book, Paper Clips (for attachments), etc, which they used each day to create and process incoming and outgoing mail.

Then he conceived an electronic version of this system. He created a computer programme of over 50,000 lines of code, which electronically replicated all the features of the interoffice mail system. On August 30, 1982, the US government officially recognized Ayyadurai as the inventor of email by awarding him the first US Copyright for Email for his 1978 invention. Yet his name is nowhere in modern history of computer science. Whoever claims the invention, Ayyadurai will remain the father of E-mail. Hope he gets the name in history he deserves.

Deva Bhatt added 4 new photos.

 

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Management, Mentoring, Networking, People / Stories

She helps women find a career after a break

January 21, 2016 11:52 IST

Saundarya Rajesh has helped more than 8,000 women get back to work.

Her inspiring story, and advice to women who want to take a mid-career break:

Dr Saundarya Rajesh

First, a few startling statistics.

  • India is ranked 123 when it comes to the female-male ratio at the work place.
  • 48% per cent of women in India abort their careers midway; this is 20% more than the global average.
  • The Indian woman’s contribution to the national GDP is 17%, which is much lower than the global average of 37%.
  • If the participation of women in the Indian workforce can be increased to 41% by 2025, it can add an estimated Rs 46 lakh crore ($700 billion) to the GDP.

No wonder then when someone like Dr Saundarya Rajesh helps women restart their career after a break, the effort is considered significant.

Saundarya was recently selected for the #100Women Initiative started by the Union ministry of women and child development, in collaboration with Facebook, to recognise and acknowledge women who are making a difference in their communities across the country.

These 100 women will meet President Pranab Mukherjee and Union Minister for Women & Child Development Maneka Gandhi in Delhi on January 22.

Saundarya’s journey as an entrepreneur began in 2000 when she co-founded Avtar with K Umasankar. Avatar then had five employees.

In 2005, she started Avtar I-Win to help women find a second career after a break. Ten years later, they have 42,000 women professionals in their network.

More than 8,000 women have re-entered the workforce because of Saundarya and her team.

In the meantime, she completed her PhD on women’s work force participation. In her own words, Saundarya shares her story of how she decided to help women find a career after a break.

Click here to read how she helps women get back to work

Business Ideas, Innovation, Mentoring, Motivations, People / Stories, Social Entrepreneurship

The blind CEO who built a 50 crore company

December 22, 2015 09:12 IST

 

Srikanth Bolla is standing tall living by his conviction that if the “world looks at me and says, ‘Srikanth, you can do nothing,’ I look back at the world and say ‘I can do anything’.”

Srikanth Bolla

When he was born, neighbours in the village suggested that his parents smother him.

It was better than the pain they would have to go through their lifetime, some said.

He is a “useless” baby without eyes… being born blind is a sin, others added.

Twenty-three years later, Srikanth Bolla (pictured left) is standing tall living by his conviction that if the “world looks at me and says, ‘Srikanth, you can do nothing,’ I look back at the world and say ‘I can do anything’.”

Srikanth is the CEO of Hyderabad-based Bollant Industries, an organisation that employs uneducated disabled employees to manufacture eco-friendly, disposable consumer packaging solutions, which is worth Rs 50 crores.

He considers himself the luckiest man alive, not because he is now a millionaire, but because his uneducated parents, who earned Rs 20,000 a year, did not heed any of the ‘advice’ they received and raised him with love and affection.

“They are the richest people I know,” says Srikanth.

Underdog success story : Click here to continue reading… 

 

Business Ideas, People / Stories, Social Entrepreneurship

Sell Waste Online

This IT engineer is urging people to sell waste online.

Did you know that you could use Facebook and Whatsapp to sell your household waste online? And also make some money off it?

Find out how a young engineer from Bhopal is doing it and urging others to follow suit.

Anurag Asati is an IT engineer who hails from Bhopal and knew at the onset that he wanted to create some impact in the world with the skills he had.

It all started one day when Anurag was asked to get a kabadiwala home to collect some newspapers.

“I started working on this, but this simple task proved pretty cumbersome. In the process, I found out everything about the waste management cycle and how the process works. at the end of it, I had come to a conclusion this is purely a gap an something needs to be done,” says the young entrepreneur.

Click to continue reading

Business Ideas

Photocatalytic composite and Sunlight to Clean Water

A Mighty Girl

On family trips to India as a child, Deepika Kurup often saw kids like herself forced to drink dirty water — as a result, at age 14, this Mighty Girl became determined to find to a way to ensure that everyone has access to safe drinking water. For an 8th grade project, the Nashua, New Hampshire teen invented a water purification system that uses a photocatalytic composite and sunlight to clean water — an invention which earned her recognition as America’s Top Young Scientist in 2012. Three years later, the now 17-year-old scientist has spent several years improving her purification system and is currently one of the finalists for the 2015 Google Science Fair!

According to Deepika, access to clean water is a global crisis; “one-ninth of the global population lacks access to clean water,” she explains “and 500,000 children die every year because of water related diseases.” On the trips to India, her immigrant parents’ native land, Deepika saw the struggle for clean water first hand: “[My parents] would have to boil the water before we drank it. I also saw children on the streets of India… take these little plastic bottles and they’re forced to fill it up with the dirty water they see on the street. And they’re forced to drink that water, because they don’t have another choice. And then I go back to America and I can instantly get tap water.”

Her early investigations into water purification methods found that many of them were expensive and potentially hazardous. “Traditionally, to purify waste water, they use chlorine, and chlorine can create harmful byproducts,” she points out. “Also, you have to keep replenishing the chlorine, you have to keep putting chlorine into the waste water to purify it.” She wanted to invent a new way to clean water that would be both cheap and sustainable.

Deepika came up with the idea of using a photocatalyst — a substance that reacts with water’s impurities when energized by the sun — that also filters the water. The combination of the reaction and the filtration can remove most contaminants for a fraction of the cost of chlorine purification. She determined that her system reduces the presence of coliform bacteria by 98% immediately after filtration and by 100% within 15 minutes. Another advantage is that her catalyst is reusable: “a catalyst doesn’t get used up in the reaction,” she says. “Theoretically you can keep using my composite forever.”

Deepika’s efforts have already by widely recognized — in addition to being named America’s Top Young Scientist in the Discovery Education 3M Young Scientist Challenge, she was also the recipient of the 2013 President’s Environmental Youth Award and the 2014 U.S. Stockholm Junior Water Prize, and she was named one of Forbes Magazine’s 2015 “30 Under 30 in Energy.” She’s also excited to meet the other finalists at next week’s Google Science Fair’s Finalist Ceremony — even if it means missing a few days of classes at her new school, Harvard University, where she plans to study neurobiology. Most of all, she’s looking for forward to taking her research from the lab to real life: “It’s one thing to be working in a lab, doing this, and another thing to actually deploy it and see it working in the real world. So that’s one of my steps in the future.”

To learn more about Deepika’s research, you can visit her Google Science Fair project page at http://bit.ly/1NjpQIq

If you’d like to encourage your own Mighty Girl’s interest in science, we showcased our favorite science kits and toys in our blog post, “Science At Play: Top 20 Science Toys for Mighty Girls” at http://www.amightygirl.com/blog?p=7692

For several stories to inspire your Mighty Girl’s spirit of discovery — all for ages 4 to 8 — check out “Rosie Revere, Engineer” (http://www.amightygirl.com/rosie-revere-engineer),”11 Experiments That Failed” (http://www.amightygirl.com/11-experiments-that-failed), and “I Wonder” (http://www.amightygirl.com/i-wonder).

To inspire children and teens with more stories of girls and women in science — both in fiction and real-life — visit our “Science & Technology” section athttp://www.amightygirl.com/…/general-int…/science-technology

Source : https://www.facebook.com/amightygirl/photos/a.360833590619627.72897.316489315054055/903392809697033/?type=1&theater

And, if your Mighty Girl loves to show off her love of science and technology, visit our STEM-themed t-shirt section at http://www.amightygirl.com/clothing?clothing_themes=146

People / Stories, Social Entrepreneurship

The Man Who Single Handedly Converted A Washed Out Land Into A 1,360 Acre Forest

May 29, 2014

Almost three decades ago, a teenager, after noticing the deaths of a large number of reptiles due to a lack of a tree cover, started planting Bamboo in an area that had been washed away by floods. Today, that same land hosts 1,360 acres of Jungle called Molai Forest, named after Jadav “Molai” Payeng, the man who made this possible single handedly!

That forest is now home to Bengal tigers, Indian rhinoceros, over 100 deer and rabbits besides apes and several varieties of birds, including a large number of vultures. There are several thousand trees. Bamboo covers an area of over 300 hectares. A herd of around 100 elephants regularly visits the forest every year and generally stays for around six months. They have given birth to 10 calves in the forest in recent years

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